Whether you are thinking about adopting a dog or a cat, or you already have a furry family member, here you will find helpful information for what to expect and what to plan for. An educated pet owner will ensure a healthy pet. On average, taking proper care of a dog or cat will cost about $400 a year. This is average for shots, monthly flea/tick control, heartworm medication, food and grooming. See below what taking care of your dog or cat properly will require. Also see the senior pet section too.

slider2A DOG NEEDS:

Yearly Heartworm Test– This is important to be able to continue to buy the heartworm medication. Yes, even if you are providing heartworm medication monthly, we need to make sure that there is no invasion of heartworms. If you have been treating your pet monthly and they do get heartworms and you have purchased the medication through us, the heartworm medication manufacturer will pay for treatment of your pet.

Yearly Wellness Exam– With providing your pet it’s yearly vaccinations, we need to make sure that your pet is in good physical condition at this time. This is a great chance to discuss any new problems, behaviors, or concerns with our Veterinarian being your pet is a year older. A wellness exam will include an overall exam that will tell us if there are concerns, or if there is anything for us to monitor as your pet ages.

Yearly DHLPP or DHPP Booster– Often referred to simply as the distemper vaccination, distemper/parvo vaccine or a “5 way” vaccine. The DHLPP vaccine prevents a number of canine viral diseases. Although not required by law, the DHLPP vaccine is one of the most important shots a dog can receive because it inoculates the animal against Parvo, a common and often fatal disease of the small intestine; distemper, a disease that affects the brain and will kill the dog; hepatitis, which affects the liver; leptospirosis, which affects the respiratory tract. The DHLPP vaccine is typically administered as a series of booster shots during a puppy’s first few months, and then given annually throughout the remainder of a dog’s life.

Annual Intestinal Parasite Exam– As most heartworm preventatives take care of preventing whipworms, round worms, and hookworms, there can always be the chance that there has been exposure to these worms and also tapeworms that are not killed with heartworm pills. Tapeworms form when your pet swallows a flea by grooming or licking grass, etc. Bringing in a small fecal sample will help us determine if there are any parasites that may be lurking in your pet’s intestines. If you are unable to bring a fecal sample, we will be able to obtain one during your visit.

Rabies Shot– Required by law! If there is question about when the vaccination was given, we start off with a one year rabies vaccination and then a year later, the pet will get a booster shot for three years. A record of this shot given to your pet is kept on our database and submitted to the county monthly. DO NOT allow your pet to need to be quarantined in the event of your pet biting another dog or worse – a person! Quarantines are done at Animal Control or at a Vet Facility. We are happy to administer this for you at any time. Appointments preferred.

Other Options: Bordetella – if in canine social environments because this guards against Kennel Cough. Flu Vaccine – now an important vaccination being the flue has become an illness we have seen more and more and can kill a dog.

Routine checks for dogs with glucose, cushings disease, thyroid disease, etc.

dvm2 (77)A CAT NEEDS:

Yearly Wellness Exam– With providing your pet it’s yearly vaccinations, we need to make sure that your pet is in good physical condition at this time. This is a great chance to discuss any new problems, behaviors, or concerns with our Veterinarian being your pet is a year older. A wellness exam will include an overall exam that will tell us if there are concerns, or if there is anything for us to monitor as your pet ages.

Annual Intestinal Parasite Exam– As most heartworm preventatives take care of preventing roundworms and hookworms, there can always be the chance that there has been exposure to these worms and also tapeworms that are not killed with heartworm pills. Tapeworms form when your pet swallows a flea by grooming or licking grass, etc. Bringing in a small fecal sample will help us determine if there are any parasites that may be lurking in your pet’s intestines. If you are unable to bring a fecal sample, we will be able to obtain one during your visit. Profender Dewormer should be given once a year and in some case more.

Rabies Shot– Required by law! If there is question about when the vaccination was given we start off with a one year rabies vaccination and then a year later, the pet will get a booster shot good for three years. A record of this shot given to your pet is kept on our database and submitted to the county monthly. DO NOT allow your pet to be quarantined in the event of your pet biting another animal or worse – a person! Quarantines are done at Animal Control or at a Vet Facility. We are happy to administer this for you. Appointments preferred.

Yearly FeLV Vaccine: Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is the leading viral killer of cats. The virus is spread from cat-to-cat through bite wounds, through casual contact with infected cats, and from an infected mother cat to her kittens. The individuals most at risk of infection are outdoor cats, indoor/outdoor cats, and cats exposed to such individuals. Cats living in households with FeLV-infected cats or with cats of unknown infection status are also at risk. Indoor-only cats with no exposure to potentially infected cats are extremely unlikely to become infected. FeLV vaccines are recommended for all cats at risk of exposure to the virus.

Yearly FVRCP Vaccine: A series of 2-3 FVRCP injections (three weeks apart) is given to kittens. The vaccine series is usually started at six to eight weeks of age. It is then given as an annual booster for the remainder of the cat’s life. There are three preventive agents in the FVRCP vaccine. The following is an explanation of each of those agents. FVR stands for Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis. Rhinotracheitis is a severe upper respiratory infection caused by a feline type 1, herpes-virus. It is most severe in young kittens and older cats, and is one of the most serious upper respiratory diseases seen in the feline species. The virus is airborne and very contagious in susceptible animals. Cats with this infection are lethargic, and show signs of respiratory involvement with much sneezing and coughing. There is usually a discharge from the nostrils and the eyes, and high temperature may be present. Some cats develop pneumonia and occasionally ulcerations in the eyes. Infected cats do not want to eat or drink because the nostrils are plugged and the throat is sore. Dehydration and weight loss are common. The disease is debilitating and chronic. Many cats require hospitalization, intravenous fluids and intensive care to help them get over the infection. Antibiotics are given to treat secondary bacterial infections. Some cats suffer permanent damage to the eyes and the respiratory system. Fortunately, the vaccine is an effective preventive agent.

C stands for Calicivirus infection: There are several strains of caliciviruses that affect the cat. They can cause a range of diseases, from a mild almost asymptomatic infection, to life-threatening pneumonia. Most cases show only evidence of problems in the mouth, nasal passages and the conjunctiva (mucus membranes) of the eyes. Early signs are loss of appetite, elevated temperature and lethargy. Later, sneezing, oral ulcers and discharge from the eyes are seen. The course of the disease in uncomplicated cases is short, and recovery may be expected in seven to ten days. Some of the more virulent strains can cause severe symptoms. They may cause rapid death in young kittens and older cats. The disease is transmitted by direct contact with an infected cat or object (bowl, cage, brush, blanket, etc.) that harbors the virus. The virus can survive eight to ten days in the environment. Carrier cats can pass the virus into the environment for up to one year.

P stands for Panleukopenia: Panleukopenia (also known as feline distemper and infectious feline enteritis) is a highly contagious disease characterized by a short course and high mortality rate. The disease is caused by a parvovirus similar to the parvovirus seen in dogs. It is very resistant and may remain infectious in the environment for up to a year. The disease is most severe in young kittens, but can affect cats of all ages. The first symptom is loss of appetite, followed by vomiting and diarrhea. A blood count usually shows a lowered number of white blood cells, a fact which helps in diagnosing the infection. Infected cats usually must be hospitalized with intensive treatment such as intravenous fluids, antibiotic and supportive care. Mortality rate may reach 90% in young kittens under six months, and may approach 50% in older animals. The vaccine is very effective in preventing the disease.

As cats enter their senior years (over 7 years of age) bloodwork becomes necessary to diagnose problems like diabetes, hyperthyroidism and kidney disease.

Image00023YOUR SENIOR PETS:

  • Bi-Annual Wellness exam
  • Bi-Annual Bloodwork
  • Eye Pressure Test

Early detection of any concerns is your best chance to keep your furry friend with you as long as possible. Sometimes when we see a pet with symptoms, it can be advanced and need serious care.